Archive for Fundraising

CauseWired Alaskans Pick, Click and Give to Charity

Socially-conscious social media is working up north: Alaskans have taken to the Pick. Click. Give. campaign, which is leveraging platforms from Facebook and Twitter to YouTube and Causecast to draw attention to and explain the Permanent Fund Charitable Contributions Program. The program began officially in 2009 to allow Alaskans to donate a portion of their PFD to qualifying Alaska nonprofits of their choice while they filed online for their PFD. An underlying goal is to encourage individual philanthropy in Alaska. Here’s a Q&A on the program with my friend Aliza Sherman, a veteran digital guru and co-founder of the social media firm Conversify! in Alaska, and Jordan Marshall, initiatives & special projects manager for the Rasmuson Foundation and project manager for Pick. Click. Give.

1. Last year, Pick. Click. Give. raised more than half a million dollars for Alaskan nonprofits – how did it work and how was it unique to Alaska?

ALIZA: The entire Pick. Click. Give. awareness campaign is based on something inherently unique to Alaska: our Permanent Fund Dividend (PFD) or the annual payment each Alaskan receives as part of a pay out to share in the state’s oil and gas profits. No other state provides a similar fund or payment to citizens of their state.

The overarching goal of the Pick. Click. Give. campaign is to draw attention to and explain the Permanent Fund Charitable Contributions Program. The program began officially in 2009 to allow Alaskans to donate a portion of their PFD to qualifying Alaska nonprofits of their choice while they filed online for their PFD. An underlying goal is to encourage individual philanthropy in Alaska.

Additionally, through social media, the Pick. Click. Give. campaign is working to give exposure to the program and motivate Alaskans to participate and to encourage their friends, family and followers to participate as well.

The previous year (2008) was spent assessing Alaska nonprofits based on a number of criteria to ensure that they qualify for the program as well as to set up the technical aspects of adding a list and way for Alaskans to check the organizations on that list they wished to support with an amount of their choice. Read the rest of this entry »

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A Rooting Interest in the Charity Smackdown

Our friend Howard Greenstein is leading the cheerleading for one of the teams in the Social Media
Smackdown for Charity
– a charity fundraiser sponsored by PayPal that’s unfolding last week and this on Twitter, Facebook and other social media networks. The tagline says it all: “Celebrities Compete, Charities Win.” It’s another in the growing lineup of short-term mini-campaigns designed to use social media get people active in causes.
Read the rest of this entry »

GiveForward: New Social Giving Tool

GiveForward is a tool that helps individuals and organizations raise and donate money quickly and easily online through a platform similar to a social networking site,” says the start-up’s founder Desiree Vargas in an interview with Beth Kanter [h/t Peter Deitz]. We’re keeping track of online social activism platforms as part of the CauseWired project, and will add GiveForward – launching later this summer – to the quickly-growing list.

Strong Relationships via Social Media?

The “PR Guy” has an excellent white paper up about how art museums can use social networks to build stronger relationships with donors and members. Here’s a piece:

I don’t know of a single museum director who doesn’t want to stay in touch with donors and patrons. In the past, marketing and communication departments have done a variety of things to keep those interested up to date on new exhibits, research and news that affects a museum. From the perspective of a communication manager successfully using this technology, building a social network between museum staff, donors and patrons is a perfect opportunity to keep them apprised of current museum trends, activities and events. On the one hand, donors are interested in how their generosity is being invested. You can give them current reports on the museum initiatives using social network technology. This tool also allows donors to create forms, discuss museum issues and truly feel like they are a part of a growing, thriving institution – they grow more and more invested as you bring them deeper and deeper into a relationship.